Platonic

 

 

 

Introduction

 

 

The Platonic solids were known to the ancient Greeks, and were described by Plato in his Timaeus ca. 350 BC. In this work, Plato equated the tetrahedron with the "element" fire, the cube with earth, the icosahedron with water, the octahedron with air, and the dodecahedron with the stuff of which the constellations and heavens were made (Cromwell 1997). Predating Plato, the neolithic people of Scotland developed the five solids a thousand years earlier. The stone models are kept in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford (Atiyah and Sutcliffe 2003).
 
Schläfli (1852) proved that there are exactly six regular bodies with Platonic properties (i.e., regular polytopes) in four dimensions, three in five dimensions, and three in all higher dimensions. However, his work (which contained no illustrations) remained practically unknown until it was partially published in English by Cayley (Schläfli 1858, 1860). Other mathematicians such as Stringham subsequently discovered similar results independently in 1880 and Schläfli's work was published posthumously in its entirety in 1901.

 

 


 
   

 
   

 
 

 

 

 

 

Cube

 

Cube

 
  Money-box
Cube size=120mm
Wood
Wenge / Hardmeapele
 

 
  Money-box
Cube size=120mm
Plywood
Copper-brass painted

 

Dodecahedron

 

Dodecahedron

 
  Massive
ABACHI-WOOD
size=R=38mm
 

 
  BLOCKS--Massive
CEDAR-WOOD
size=R=38mm
 

 
  BOTTLE OPENER
WALNUT-WOOD
size R =38mm
 

 
  BOXES
 

 
  BOX
OAK
size R = 60mm
 

 
  Boxes in different size's Acryl (Perspex)

 

Icosahedron

 

 Icosahedron

 
  Collection
 

 
  Massive
Abachi - Wood
size = R = 38 mma
 

 
  Walnut - Wood
Corkscrew
 

 
  Box
Oak 6 mm
size R = 112 mm
 

 
  Chestnut
Camping Arts
H = 350 mm

 

Octahedron

 

Octahedron

 
  Massive
Willowood
size  R = 34 mm
 

 
  Box
Painted MDF
R = 80mm
 

 
 

Box
Hard maple
R = 36 mm

 

Tetrahedron

 

Tetrahedron

 
  Massive
Willow - Wood
size = R = 36 mm
 

 
  Puzzles in two identical parts
Various materials
 

 
  Moneybox
Painted MDF
size H = 250 mm